Why Kitchen Towels are known as Tea Towels?

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In the 18th century England, a tea towel was special linen used to dry the expensive china tea things. Servants were considered too ham-fisted to be trusted with such a delicate job, although housemaids were charged with hand-hemming the woven linen when their main duties were completed.  Tea towels began being mass-produced during the Industrial Revolution as clean tea towels were spread over a tea tray before tea things were put onto it, or used to cover warm scones or a tea pot to prevent heat loss.

Linen is the traditional fibre for tea towels, since it can be used to dry delicate plates and silverware without the risk of scratching. In general, tea towels are made with a simple weave, rather than a looped terry and they are made in a hand towel size. Tea towels made from cotton are not uncommon, and a cotton tea towel tends to be much less costly, making it suitable for daily use. In some cases, a tea towel is woven in a pattern, while in other instances; it may be decorated with paint or embroidery.

From there, tea towels became more generally used as kitchen towels, but the name stuck even though the tea is long gone. They are vastly available in England and Ireland, two nations well known for their tea. Outside of these nations, numerous companies are supplying genuine English tea towels.  Small light cloth excellent for drying dishes and cutlery after they have been washed.

Many kitchen supply stores sell cotton tea towels. Tea towels made from cotton  tends to be much less costly, making it suitable for daily use. In some cases, a tea towel is woven in a pattern, while in other rare instances; it may be decorated with paint or embroidery.  In general, tea towels are made with a simple weave, rather than a looped terry and they are made in a hand towel size.  Common sizes are • 30cm x 30cm • 45cm x 70cm • 50cm x 70cm but sizes do vary according to the customers requirement. The range consists of yarn dyed, printed in various sizes and constructions. Woven on plain, dobby and jacquard loom.

 These towels can be machine washed at 60°C but do not bleach them. Always tumble dry at normal cycle. You can iron at high temperature but dry cleaning is not recommended, you can bring the brightness into your kitchen by colourful cotton tea towel by visiting www.canariatex.com

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Helen Roberto is a freelance writer and loves to participate in discussion of textile industry globally. In her spare time, she works as an admin to maintain this blog and few others. Her knowledge on the subject has benefited many associated to home textile manufacturing and marketing.

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